P1382 The Prevalence of Opportunistic Infections in Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis Varies by Gender

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    *EMBARGOED All research presented at the 2018 ACG Annual Scientific Meeting and Postgraduate Course is strictly embargoed until Monday, October 8, 2018, at 8:00 am EDT.


    Mohammed Z. Sheriff, MD

    Mohammed Z. Sheriff, MD

    P1382 The Prevalence of Opportunistic Infections in Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis Varies by Gender

    Author Insight from Mohammed Z. Sheriff, MD, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

    What’s new here and important for clinicians?

    It has been proposed that opportunistic infections are more common in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), however there has been a lack of large population-based studies on the risk of opportunistic infections in IBD. This study is the largest of its kind to identify the risk of opportunistic infections in IBD. It emphasizes to clinicians that while these diseases are rare, they are an important consideration for patients with IBD.

    What do patients need to know?

    A diagnosis of IBD puts patients at increased risk of infection and may even suggest a need for screening or vaccinations.

    Read the Abstract

    Figure 1

    Author Contact
    Mohammed Z. Sheriff, MD, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center
    Mohammed.Sheriff@UHhospitals.org


    Media Interview Requests
    To arrange an interview with any ACG experts or abstract authors, please contact Brian Davis of ACG via email at bdavis@gi.org or by phone at 301-263-9000.

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