Poster 1805 Statins Reduce the Risk of Clostridium difficile Diarrhea: A Meta-Analysis

Share
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • email
  • StumbleUpon
  • Delicious
  • Google Reader
  • LinkedIn
  • Google Bookmarks

    *EMBARGOED All research presented at the World Congress of Gastroenterology at ACG2017 is strictly embargoed until Monday, October 16, 2017, at 8:00 am EDT.


    Sakolwan Suchartlikitwong, MD

    Poster 1805 Statins Reduce the Risk of Clostridium difficile Diarrhea: A Meta-Analysis

    Author Insight from Sakolwan Suchartlikitwong, MD, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

    What’s new here and important for clinicians?

    Clostridium difficile is one of the most ubiquitous pathogens in infectious nosocomial diarrhea in the United States. The reported case-fatality rates of Clostridium difficile infection are 6% to 30% and have been rising recently. The recent observational studies suggest an effect of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) on the risk of Clostridium difficile infection. We performed a meta-analysis to determine the risk and clinical outcomes of Clostridium difficile infection in patients who receive statin therapy and in patients not on statin therapy. Compared with patients who did not receive statins, statins reduced the risk of Clostridium difficile infection (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.99). However, among patients who developed Clostridium difficile infection, the use of statins did not significantly reduce recurrent risk of infection or 30-day mortality. Our study demonstrates a significant association between statins use and reduced risk of Clostridium difficile infection, but not the clinical outcomes. These findings might impact the clinical management and primary prevention of Clostridium difficile infection.

    What do patients need to know?

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are a common, widely prescribed medication in cardiovascular diseases and hyperlipidemia. Statins are found to have a protective effect against Clostridium difficile infection, which is the most common infectious diarrhea in the hospital.

    Read the Abstract

    See Figure

    Author Contact
    Sakolwan Suchartlikitwong, MD, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center
    Sakolwan.suchartlikitwong@ttuhsc.edu


    Media Interview Requests:

    To arrange an interview with any ACG experts or abstract authors, please contact Brian Davis of ACG via email at mediaonly@gi.org or by phone at 301-263-9000.

    Share
    • Twitter
    • Facebook
    • email
    • StumbleUpon
    • Delicious
    • Google Reader
    • LinkedIn
    • Google Bookmarks