ACG Questions ABIM’s Decision on Longer Testing Requirements

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    Dr. Kenneth DeVault in Philadelphia September 15, 2016

    Dr. Kenneth DeVault in Philadelphia September 15, 2016

    This week, ACG expressed its disappointment to the ABIM upon learning that ABIM will require an additional module for diplomates sitting for the upcoming re-certification exam.  This adds an additional 60 questions and 2 hours’ time to the exam.  The 60 new questions are “beta questions” that will be incorporated into all four modules, but will not be counted against the diplomates taking the exam. Clearly, this is contradictory to ACG’s request (and that of others across internal medicine) for the exam to be simpler, less intrusive, and less burdensome.

    This change was also made unilaterally, despite ABIM’s promise to work in a collaborative process with physician organizations.  As noted by ACG President Kenneth R. DeVault:

    “ACG encourages ABIM to examine your decision making and communication processes. This lack of transparency does not lend itself to a collegial atmosphere and leads to a questioning of ABIM ulterior motives.”

    In September, Dr. DeVault participated in a meeting convened by the American College of Physicians, including representatives from ABIM the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM).  Read Dr. DeVault’s recent update on the meeting in the ACG President’s Blog: Sending a Signal on MOC.

    Keep track of ACG’s efforts to make the MOC process less complicated, more clinically relevant, and less expensive for those who wish to maintain board certification.  “We support the principles of lifelong learning as evidenced by ongoing CME activities, rather than lifelong testing.”

    ACG Board of Governors Advocating at the State Level

    The ACG Board of Governors is committed to change at the state level as well, advocating on your behalf through efforts including updating members on recent changes in legislation involving MOC in Missouri, Michigan, North Carolina, and Oklahoma.  Fortunately, the unique function and structure of the ACG Board of Governors is a natural fit for these issues, allowing the College to be actively engaged at the state level.  Contact your ACG Governor to help get your state involved.

    Kenneth R. DeVault, MD, FACG

    President, American College of Gastroenterology

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