Colorectal Cancer Screening Programs Must Address Unique Barriers of African American, Hispanics

Share
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • email
  • StumbleUpon
  • Delicious
  • Google Reader
  • LinkedIn
  • Google Bookmarks

    Tara Keihanian, MD, MPH

    Tara Keihanian, MD, MPH

    Poster 551 Colorectal Cancer Screening Barriers Among Minorities in the United States: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Author Insight from Tara Keihanian, MD, MPH, Jackson Memorial Hospital/ University of Miami

    What’s new here and important for clinicians?

    Colorectal cancer screening rates are suboptimal among minority populations, especially among African-American and Hispanic groups, in the United States. This series identified colorectal cancer screening barriers that are unique to, and shared by, these minority groups. Identifying these barriers and designing screening programs sensitive to these barriers is important if our community is to achieve the goal of 80% screened by 2018.

    What do patients need to know?

    Many colorectal cancer screening tests are available.  Options exist that may make colorectal cancer screening more palatable with respect to barriers in racial/ethnic minority groups. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends routine colorectal cancer screening for adults at average risk, beginning at age 50 years and continuing until age 75 years. The USPSTF guidelines recommend several options, including stool testing, sigmoidoscopy, or colonoscopy as the appropriate screening methods.

     Read the abstract

    Author Contact Tara Keihanian, MD, MPH, Jackson Memorial Hospital/ University of Miami

    t.keihanian@med.miami.edu

     


    Media Interview Requests:

    To arrange an interview with any ACG experts or abstract authors please contact Jacqueline Gaulin of ACG via email jgaulin@gi.org or by phone at 301-263-9000.

    Share
    • Twitter
    • Facebook
    • email
    • StumbleUpon
    • Delicious
    • Google Reader
    • LinkedIn
    • Google Bookmarks