A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Ozanimod, an Oral S1P Receptor Modulator, in Moderate to Severe Ulcerative Colitis: Results of the Maintenance Period of the TOUCHSTONE Study

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    Stephen B. Hanauer, MD, FACG

    Stephen B. Hanauer, MD, FACG

    Oral 19 A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Ozanimod, an Oral S1P Receptor Modulator, in Moderate to Severe Ulcerative Colitis: Results of the Maintenance Period of the TOUCHSTONE Study

    Author Insight from Stephen B. Hanauer, MD, Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University

    What’s new here and important for clinicians?

    Ozanimod is a sphingosine 1-phosphate 1 receptor (S1P1R) modulator. S1P1R is expressed on white blood cells (lymphocytes), including those responsible for the development of disease. S1P1R modulation causes selective and reversible retention, or sequestration, of circulating lymphocytes in peripheral lymphoid tissue. This sequestration is achieved by modulating cell migration patterns (known as “lymphocyte trafficking”), specifically preventing migration of autoreactive lymphocytes to areas of disease inflammation, which is a major contributor to autoimmune disease. S1P1R modulation may also involve the reduction of lymphocyte migration into the gut in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.  Ozanimod has also undergone preliminary trials in multiple sclerosis, with promising results.  This therapeutic approach diminishes the activity of autoreactive lymphocytes that are the underlying cause of many types of autoimmune disease.  Ozanimod is administered orally, once daily.

    What do patients need to know?

    Other agents that impact on lymphocyte trafficking (e.g. natalizumab, Tysabri® and vedolizumab, and Entyvio®) have been effective in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.  Similar to other lymphocyte trafficking agents, the risk of infections and malignancies appears to be low.

    We are reporting on a phase II trial that demonstrated both induction and maintenance effects with one daily, oral ozanimod.

    Read the abstract

    Author Contact Stephen B. Hanauer, MD, Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University

    shanauer@northwestern.edu


    Media Interview Requests:

    To arrange an interview with any ACG experts or abstract authors please contact Jacqueline Gaulin of ACG via email jgaulin@gi.org or by phone at 301-263-9000.

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