Increased Risk of Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Patients With Active Celiac Disease on Biopsy: Results From a National Pathology Database

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    p3 Increased Risk of Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Patients With Active Celiac Disease on Biopsy: Results From a National Pathology Database

    Elizabeth Jensen, MPH, PhD

    Elizabeth Jensen, MPH, PhD

    Author insight from Elizabeth Jensen, MPH PhD, Center for Esophageal Diseases and Swallowing; University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC

    What’s new here and important for clinicians?
    Previous studies evaluating the association between celiac disease and eosinophilic esophagitis have been limited by a lack of suitable comparator population. In this study, we were able to assess whether there was evidence of an association between these conditions among a large patient population undergoing both esophageal and duodenal biopsies (n=88,517). We found evidence of a weak association between the two conditions. Specifically, among those with active celiac disease on biopsy, there was an increase in odds of also having active eosinophilic esophagitis (adjusted OR: 1.26, 95% CI: 0.98, 1.60). Results were robust to sensitivity analyses exploring other disease conditions and varying definitions of eosinophilic esophagitis. The results of this study suggest that both esophageal and duodenal biopsies may be necessary when there is clinical suspicion of either eosinophilic esophagitis or celiac disease.

    What do patients need to know?
    Patients with eosinophilic esophagitis or celiac disease may be at a slight increased risk of having both conditions. When receiving an upper endoscopy to assess for the presence of either condition, it may be necessary to obtain biopsies from both the esophagus and duodenum to rule out the possibility of having both conditions.   Patients with celiac disease, experiencing esophageal symptoms (i.e. dysphagia, refractory reflux, chest pain), should be closely examined and/or biopsies obtained to assess for eosinophilic esophagitis during an endoscopy.

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    Author Contact

    Elizabeth Jensen, MPH PhD, Center for Esophageal Diseases and Swallowing; University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC
    elizabeth_jensen@med.unc.edu

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    Media Interview Requests:

    To arrange an interview with any ACG experts or abstract authors please contact Jacqueline Gaulin of ACG via email jgaulin@gi.org or by phone at 301-263-9000.

     

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