Celiac Disease in Women With Infertility: A Meta-Analysis

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    P187 Celiac Disease in Women With Infertility: A Meta-Analysis

    Prashant Singh, MD

    Prashant Singh, MD

    Author insight from Prashant Singh, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston

    What’s new here and important for clinicians?

    This study confirms an association between celiac disease and  infertility in women. The meta-analysis confirms that women with infertility have 4.6 times increased odds of having celiac disease. The risk increases even further and approaches 6 folds if the cause of the infertility is not known. Thus, our study suggests that women with infertility are at higher risk of celiac disease and they should be screened for celiac disease. This suggestion becomes even more important if cause of infertility is unexplained.

    What do patients need to know?

    Women with infertility (especially those in whom cause of infertility is not known) should ask their doctors if they should be screened for celiac disease. One can be screened for celiac disease using simple blood tests.The literature suggests that infertility due to celiac disease can be reversed with gluten free diet. Thus, infertility due to celiac disease is easy to diagnose and treat. However, it is often missed due to lack of awareness.

    Read the abstract

    singh

    Author Contact
    Prashant Singh, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
    psingh6@partners.org, prashant2303@gmail.com

    Related Abstracts
    P1181 Pathologic Findings on Repeat Biopsy in Children With Celiac Disease on a Gluten-Free Diet
    P3 Increased Risk of Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Patients With Active Celiac Disease on Biopsy: Results From a National Pathology Database


    Media Interview Requests:

    To arrange an interview with any ACG experts or abstract authors please contact Jacqueline Gaulin of ACG via email jgaulin@gi.org or by phone at 301-263-9000.

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